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of this grant and the mayor coming to tell us that he supports these efforts in the strongest possible way and will over the next administration is just news that's important for everybody in the community. so we're proud to be here and i can't wait to see who hits that wall with that hammer. and begins the good work. congratulations, everyone. [applause] >> i think, with that, we're going to begin our ground breaking and i think our mayor has the opportunity for the first swing. mayor lee: are we ready? ok! [applause] >> hi. we'd like to welcome you to our brown bag lunch talk today. we do this every third thursday in san francisco. and today we are at e&e electric, 1775 mission street, right by the building department office where we are going to walk around and look at all of this fantastic equipment. shinny, wonderful stuff. complicated stuff. what could this possibly be used for? we have with us today, david green, senior electrical inspector who is a good friend of mine and a well-known sailor on the san francisco bay. you're going to sail this saturday. and mr. lloyd and mrs. lloyd.
of this fantastic equipment. shinny, wonderful stuff. complicated stuff. what could this possibly be used for? we have with us today, david green, senior electrical inspector who is a good friend of mine and a well-known sailor on the san francisco bay. you're going to sail this saturday. and mr. lloyd and mrs. lloyd. thanks for letting us come in here. really appreciate it. you're an electrical contractor, too. right? >> i'm electrical for 26 years. we do lots of big projects. we dot lots of industrial and commercial and residential. >> so you have to get a california special license. you have to be a special licensee to do electrical what is that license? >> yes. i have a c-10 licen and b license. >> b is a general contractor's license. >> yes. more interesting for me, i do a lot of c-10 for electrical. >> about three, four years ago you opened up a supply house. >> we opened e & e electric for around five years. >> you don't have so many guys out on the field any more. >> no more. i just have a lot of contractors. they come in for a lot of questions about national code. so if i understand, i t
stuff. what could this possibly be used for? we have with us today, david green, senior electrical inspector who is a good friend of mine and a well-known sailor on the san francisco bay. you're going to sail this saturday. and mr. lloyd and mrs. lloyd. thanks for letting us come in here. really appreciate it. you're an electrical contractor, too. right? >> i'm electrical for 26 years. we do lots of big projects. we dot lots of industrial and commercial and residential. >> so you have to get a california special license. you have to be a special licensee to do electrical what is that license? >> yes. i have a c-10 licen and b license. >> b is a general contractor's license. >> yes. more interesting for me, i do a lot of c-10 for electrical. >> about three, four years ago you opened up a supply house. >> we opened e & e electric for around five years. >> you don't have so many guys out on the field any more. >> no more. i just have a lot of contractors. they come in for a lot of questions about national code. so if i understand, i tell them whatever i know. my knowledge. >> i think
of supervisors came together to select an outstanding choice along many outstanding candidates to lead us over the next several years. >> over the past several months when this issue has come up, it had been agonizing. the board has been put into a difficult situation. there are a lot of differences of opinion on how to run the city, how to mass make a decision, who should be in place, 11 people to agree on that is a challenging thing. i think we have done the best we can do in the process, considering the difference of opinions. >> the people of san francisco can now choose their mayor, the direction they want to go. that is why this decision was so appropriate. >> the other big shock is that the moderates seem to have won this round. people thought, progressives have themselves on the board. there is no reason that they will not get together and take a noted leader who is a progressive to be interim mayor, and then stayed there for another term. the great thing about being in term mayor is to get to run as an incumbent. the fact that the progressives could not get together to get somebody in
of apprenticeships spirit i excepts. he must not abandon the plan that has given us record low interest rates. >> this is not working. today's figures show it is not working. it is his failure that means we -- whatly 1,000,001 peopl this government is pledged to do is everything we can to get our economy moving. that is why we cut corporation tax and why we are reforming the system. this is why we created the zone. i know what he wants. he wants us to change course on reducing our deficit. we would end up with interest rates like portugal and spain and italy. we it would send our economy into a tailspin. >> we want people to get back to work. what the prime minister does not seem to understand that unemployment goes month of. the cost goes up. hear people are in work. teen-age a credible flight for growth. it is not just young people. when was the last time the unemployment reached a level it has today. >> he is wrong. there are 50,000 more men and women than there were at the time of the election. there are half a million more credible jobs. he specifically asked about a credible growth plan
amendment and bill us ouof the congress will not. we're sad because of too much concentrated wealth, subsidized and born of government protection, too much poverty borne of government neglect, to many of wars, to my children killing children, too many jobs leaving and too much drugs coming. we can and malnutrition now. we can relieve sudent loan debt now. dr. king would be said that america had a moment and history of historic proportions in 2008 but they elected barack obama. yet that reduction has been met with unrelenting retribution, retaliation, then on and on printed -- unprecedented opposition. people seem to be willing to sink the ship just to destroy the captain. we have to be bter than that. [applause] like lyndon baines johnson, poverty was restored in the great society. dr. king would not settle for shifting the chairs on the deck of the titanic. he wanted to plug the holes to stop the water from coming in. 43 years after dr. king's plan and occupation on this same sp, he would say to the occupiers on wl street,he movement has gone global and you are the offspring of dr.
to assassinate the saudi arabian ambassador to the u.s. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on the clandestine operation and the administration's push to punish iran with new sanctions. >> brown: then, we examine the economic and social fall-out from alabama's tough new immigration law. >> woodruff: margaret warner reports on the visit of south korea's president lee as he and president obama celebrate a new trade deal and consider how to rein in north korea's nuclear ambitions. >> with north korea you never have a good option. the worse options is to leave them alone and to let their nuclear missile program go completely unabated for four years of obama. >> brown: ray suarez explores fascinating new research on the genetic makeup of the bubonic plague that killed millions of europeans in the middle ages. >> woodruff: and tom clarke of i.t.n. reports from the remote highlands of colombia, where half the population will inherit early onset alzheimers disease. >> these families' plight has come to attention of the ou
with illnesses were blocked from getting out of the plane. and abc's lisa stark brings us the first answers tonight. >> reporter: this is what greeted passengers when they finally escaped their parked planes. a foot of snow and a long walk. >> we've been here now for seven and a half hours. >> reporter: that was the captain of jetblue flight 504 with 123 passengers. one of those planes stuck in the snowy tarmac at the hartford, connecticut, airport. >> chaotic. uncomfortable, disorganized. just a mess. >> reporter: andrew carter was on that flight, normally a two-houg jog from florida to new jersey. but the plane couldn't land after newark after the airport lost critical navigation equipment. the pilots diverted to the hartford airport, 100 miles away. jetblue says that airport was overwhelmed with nearly two dozen over diverted flights. and today, we learned why the passengers were trapped. flight 504 was boxed in on the tarmac. a delta plane behind, another jetblue flight to the right, a broken jetway on the left. inside the plane, snacks and water ran out, toilets backed up. >> i have a
the narrow drain. we caught the tar and the bullet we came to the body encostic casement of skin rig motor us framed the opened mouths scream. wail for your mother wrap our sons in silken ribbons in a galaxy. the cause has been perp traited. we are adrift on a baron sea. the fleet diminishes me. who shouts for us now, dear empire? this next one is a postcard for a reason that i kept of harold's club in reno, nevada. i don't know if it exists it's a really old postcard. harold's club made we think of harold and the purple crayon. harold's club. who would figure let loose the boy with the purple crayon. let him conkokt the loses slots in women. let loose his imagination. ended as high as sea gulls or the reverse w's topped with bold topped centers the rudeaments of the buzzum and life itself. >> pen and ink. in the way we demonstrate speech by quotation marks the ill administrator kapt urs speed by 2 lines of the pen much the trotting horse quoted at the knees all 4 and the lady side saddled atop him frozen in place by crossed hatched marks. courseut to indicate the petticoat aroused into acti
. christin ayers shows us the celebrity who drew boos with the mere mention of the mayor's name. >> reporter: and dana, that celebrity is filmmaker michael moore. he was out here speaking to this crowd which has swelled to hundreds in the past couple of hours. this group is on their nightly general assembly meeting and planning a general strike next week against banks and other corporations. >> reporter: the crowd of provide testers swelled friday as michael moore took center stage in support of a movement that took on a life of its own. at the mere mention of jean quan's name. >> i sent her an email asking if we could speak. >> boo! >> police departments and police unions across the country supporting the "occupy" movement in their towns. albany, new york a beautiful example. the governor told them to remove the people and the police said, we don't consider that part of police work. [ applause and cheers ] >> reporter: the mayor was in this press conference within earshot of the crowd explaining why she suddenly flip-flopped this week backing down from the crackdown that she authorized in
. >> good morning, everyone. a beautiful start for us on this sunday. fog has burned off. it is 59 degrees. after the cool start in the 40's, it is 59 at the airport. the humidity 78%. barometric pressure nice and high. the high temperatures this afternoon up around 80 degrees. we'll check the seven-day forecast when i come back in a few minutes. >> our big story this morning is a bleach fight in baltimore county. the hazmat team had to be called in and the entire store evacuated. >> 19 people were rushed to the hospital. sheldon dutes has more on what happened. >> i wasn't really scared, but i have a baby so i had to get out. >> the shong trip was cut short after a fight between two women spiraled out of control. around 11:00 in the morning, theresa jefferson followed a woman into the arbutus store. >> a suspect grabbed whatever she could grab at the time, and she grabbed bleach and a bottle of ammonia and poured these on the victim as she was assaulting the victim down on the ground. continued to pour these on her. >> they said they needed to evacuate the store. >> the problem was if it
and track the latest contributions. easy to use, it helps you navigate the political landscape with twitter feeds and facebook updates from the campaigns. plus, links to c-span media partners, all at c- span.org/campaign2012. president obama hence to nevada today for a couple of campaign events as part of a three-day trip through western states. the associated press reports the president will talk about jobs. nevada has the nation's highest unemployment rate at nearly 13.5%. the president goes to california tomorrow, colorado tomorrow night. republican presidential candidate michele bachmann was in iowa this past weekend for several campaign events. she spoke to this conversation at a service in cash out -- at cavalry bible church. she talked about the trip that her ancestors made to the u.s. before settling in iowa. she talks about how her fate has affected her life. trolley after arriving, she greeted congregation members. this is about 55 minutes. >> what is your name? good to meet you. hello, mary. you are an old farmer? i married a young one. >> thank you. >> she want to get a picture
at home for joining us this week. one story list week almost made it into the best new thing in the world today but got cut at the last minute because something better came along. a story about an arkansas high school marching band turning up at the house of one of their player's grandmothers because grandmother was too ill to go to the game. i still love that story. go, rogers heritage high school. what roger heritage high school of arkansas pushed out of the best new thing in the world segment that day, what got cut from the marching band segment, is what mediaite highlighted as when horrible people unite. when the president of iran spoke at the united nations last week the main news he made, of course, is that everybody walked out on him again like they pretty much always do now whenever he speaks in public. quoting from "the guardian" newspaper reporting on the walkout, u.s. diplomats were first to leave when ahmadinejad referred to the mysterious september 11th incident as a pretext to attack afghanistan and iraq. the mysterious september 11th incident. good-bye, mahmoud. see you lat
: there is consequences for plotting to kill the saudi ambassador on u.s. soil. and they warn about cutting too much from the military budget. herman cain takes the lead. analysis of the candidate and his 9-9-9 plan. live from the studio in washington. this is "special report." good evening. i'm bret baier. president obama says iran will pay a price for involve in the plot to kill the saudi ambassador to the u.s. on u.s. soil. the president did not rule out a response that goes beyond the economic sanctions. chief white house correspondent ed henry has the story. >> president obama accused iran of a pattern of dangerous and reckless behaifior that led the door open for military action. >> there will be consequences to action. wow don't take options off the table for how we operate with iran. but you can expect us to continue to apply the pressure that will have a direct impact on the iranian government. >> reporter: at a joint news conference with south korean president lee, mr. obama compared iran to north carolina as international outlaw -- north korea as international outlaw in wake of trying to kill
here in the region, we've seen a deterioration in the relationship between the u.s. and saudi arabia, a chilling effect going on, because the saudis saw the u.s. as supporting the revolutionary movement in egypt and they don't like revolutionary movements going on in this region. >> we will wait and see. thank you very much. >>> thank you very much. we will continue -- wolf blitzer will continue this coverage, very serious story with clearly international implications, "the situation room with wolf blitzer" starts right now. >> brooke, thanks very much. >>> happening now, breaking news. an alleged iranian plot to assassinate the saudi ambassador to the united states. two men now charged. one is due in court this hour. >>> we're also following reaction this hour from tehran to riyadh to the white house and beyond. our correspondents around the world are standing by. and the united states is vowing to hold inner accountable, but how? we're working all angles of this major breaking news story right now. i'm wolf blitzer, you're in "the situation room." we're also awaiting a state
isn't the only way to talk about what racism looks like. it isn't useful. i think what's more useful is to get people to think about the ways in which we perpetuate the racial differentiations and inequalities on purpose or inadvertently that produce differences that we see every day. unless you're going to tell me there's some hard-wired reason why people of color and academic institutions are always the people serving you food or cleaning the bathroom or not necessarily in the classroom teaching classes, then i think you're going to have to be honest with yourself about all the ways there's a privilege that accrues to people. we need to recognize that race is more subliminal, more subjective and more subtle in the contemporary moment. and i think we need to find a way to really articulate that subtlety because there are or very few smoking guns, thank god, anymore. i asked my 105 interview wees what is the most racist thing that ever happened to you. the response i received most often was indicate i have of modern racism. the answer is unknowable. aaron mcgruder said, i'd imagine i
historical ambition of creating a more perfect union can, by definition, never end. as dr. king showed us, the power to create a more perfect union lies in each of us. un die, we can correct injustice. we can work for equality and we can work to improve and eliminate poverty in our country. we can do so with and all law and through the institutions that defined as a great. nation this tomorrow reminds us that not only can we make america better, it is our responsibility to make a better. on behalf of chevrolet and gmc and foundation and everyone at gm, i congratulate and salute the king family come the mlk memorial foundation and all of america for ensuring the everlasting legacy of this trip. a great man -- of this truly great man. thanks [applause] you. >> please welcome dedication co- chairman and president designer and co-founder of the tommy hilfiger corporate foundation, tommy hilfiger. >> thank you very much a [applause] it is a special honor to join the king family, the martin luther king jr. foundation, and the many dignitaries as well as my fellow americans in celebrating the le
, which we celebrate a man and a movement that did so much for this country, let us draw strength from those earlier struggles. first and foremost, let us remember that change has never been quick. change has never been simple or without controversy. change depends on persistence. change requires determination. it took a full decade before the moral guidance of brown versus board of education was translated into the enforcement measures of the civil rights about and the voting rights act. but those ten long years did not lead dr. king to give up. he kept on pushing. he kept on speaking. he kept on marching until change finally came. and when the civil rights and voting rights act was passed, americans still found themselves trammed in pockets of povr across the country. dr. king d didn't say this was a failure, this is too hard, let's settle for what we got and let's go home. instead, he said let's take those victories and broaden our mission to achieve not just civil and political equality but also economic justice. let's fight for a living wage and beer schools and jobs for all who a
but over, and pledged to pull out u.s. forces by the end of this year. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> woodruff: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we excerpt the president's remarks; and margaret warner talks with white house deputy national security advisor denis mcdonough about the coming draw-down . >> woodruff: then, we ask libya's ambassador to the u.s., ali suleiman aujali, about the questions surrounding moammar qaddafi's death and what's next for his country. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and paul solman talks to author michael lewis about his new book, a travelogue of sorts about nations hit hard by the financial crisis. >> all these different societies were faced with exactly the same temptation-- free money. they behaved radically differently from one another. why? >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it'
will get to know him and talk about the toughest issues facing them. thank you for joining us today. tell us about your background. >> my parents immigrated to the united states in the 1960's. i was the first kid born in the u.s. my parents sacrificed everything so that their kids could have the opportunities that they wanted when they came here. i grew up in the boston area and lived in different parts of boston. i went to catholic price school in dorchester, a section of boston. -- i went to catholic high school in dorchester, a section of boston. because of my parents, my brothers and i were all blessed to go to harvard university. that is where i went to school. it was intense. i stayed there for law school and have a master's in public policy from there. those are subjects i decided to study because i was interested in public service and public policy issues and government. >> you grew up in the boston area. what made you want to make the transition and moved to san francisco? what motivated you to get involved in politics question marks before i ran for office, and worked in san fra
>>> thank you for joining us. i'm jc hayward. the case resumes against brittany norwood. she's been charged with killing her coworkers inside the lulu lemon shop in bethesda last marg. andrea mccarran joins us with the latest development. >> reporter: another interesting day in court. right now we are awaiting the judge's decision, a critical decision on whether the very gravity photographs, including autopsy photos of victim jayna murray, will be allowed to be introduced during opening statements. joining me now is our legal analyst jim shallic, best known for prosecuting the son of sam case in new york. jim, what is the significance of judge greenberg's decision here? >> very significant. he has to weigh whether these pictures are so prejudicial that miss norwood cannot get a fair trial against the government's right to introduce relevant evidence. this is a crucial decision. >> reporter: and even if these photographs are not introduced during opening statements, they can still be introduced during the trial, correct? >> yes, they can. but the judge has to make the same decision.
late steve jobs. thank you for talking to us this evening. >> that does it for us tonight. i'm ezra klein. rachel will be back tomorrow. follow me on twitter at twitter.com/ezra klein. it is now time for "the ed show." good night. >>> good evening, americans. welcome to "the ed show." from new york, the 99% are out protesting across the country. today president obama acknowledged the occy wall street movement and the potential affect it might have on the next election. but herman cain didn't seem to get the message and is calling them un-american. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> i would with love nothing more than to see congress act so aggressively that i can't campaign against them as a do-nothing congress. >> reporter: the president is hammering republicans on jobs and republicans continue to attack the 99% movement. >> if you don't have a job and you are not rich, blame yourself. >> tonight, van jones, laura flander and john nichols on today's occupy protests. house republicans refuse to condemn rick perry's name hunting camp and rick perry is speaking out on the is
pretty by eve of u.s. manufacturing only california in population of texas twice the our sta population make more than we do. if we we are not just talking about those are really important we are talking about jobs and clean c energy and alsoon supplies. ..liation, we welcome this debate. i want my colleagues to come to the floor. some of the 19 that opposed moving this bill forward. when they say china will start this will start a trade war. they talk about world trade organization compliance, they talk about retaliation. the fact is china has been playing that trade war for ten years. the american people have been patient as administration after administration continues to talk but fails to act. patience -- our patience is up as u.s. businesses are undercut, more u.s. jobs are eliminated. the bill is about our economic competitiveness where everyone is competing in the market by the same set of i've been to maybe 150 manufacturing plants in my state in the last three or four years. i know american businesse
's empire. >>> plus, a u.s. senator accused of plagerism. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> a visit by the south korean president overshadowed by the unfolding international drama surround i surrounding an alleged iranian terror plot. for the first time, president obama spoke at length about what the united states maintains was a plan to assassinate the saudi ambassador to the united states here in washington, d.c. let's go straight to jessica yellin. jessica, the president was asked about the links to the iranian government. what did he say today? >> he declined to say the highest levels of the iranian government had knowledge of it. he would not say that the nation's supreme leader or president was aware of it. >> i don't think the problem here jessica is that i have not been unwilling to negotiate with republicans. i've shown repeatedly my willingness to work overtime. to try to get them to do something. he had direct links. was paid by and directed by individuals in the iranian government. now, those facts are there for all to see. and we would not be bringing forw
show do creator is here to talk about it all. >> great to have you with us. thank you for watching "the ed show." herman cain launched another tirade against the 99% movement. the former ceo of godfather's pizza blasted him last night. according to the associated press, herman cain called the occupy wall street protesters un-american. the pizzaman doesn't have a clue because he hasn't been there while herman cain has been touring the country on his presidential campaign/book tour i've been out there with the folks and i know they are not un-american. i'll let you be the judge. >> what this is the 99%. this is the vast majority of the american people. >> capital of the world is getting a lot of attention right now in terms of the mistreatment and the unfair burden that's being placed on working families. >> why are you i here? >> to tax the rich. tax the rich. they are not paying their fair share. >> they are not paying their fair share. i want our money back. >> there are republicans and this is not about a party. this is about a movement to take it back to the people. >> i'm here becau
about the toughest issues facing them. thank you for joining us today. tell us about your background. >> my parents immigrated to the united states in the 1960's. i was the first kid born in the u.s. my parents sacrificed everything so that their kids could have the opportunities that they wanted when they came here. i grew up in the boston area and lived in different parts of boston. i went to catholic price school in dorchester, a section of boston. -- i went to catholic high school in dorchester, a section of boston. because of my parents, my brothers and i were all blessed to go to harvard university. that is where i went to school. it was intense. i stayed there for law school and have a master's in public policy from there. those are subjects i decided to study because i was interested in public service and public policy issues and government. >> you grew up in the boston area. what made you want to make the transition and moved to san francisco? what motivated you to get involved in politics question marks before i ran for office, and worked in san francisco as a criminal pros
to pay the rest of us $3.50 an hour in the 1960's. host: you can also send us e- mail at journal@c-span.org. this is the scene from times square. that is the nasdaq symbol, not far from broadway and became crown zero and the new york rallies go across the globe. here is a story, that the world wide protest were not court netted but not quite spontaneous. -- coordinated but not quite spontaneous. that essentially summarizes what happened over the weekend inside the "new york times" and robert joins us from of rhode island. caller: where it should be heading is that we have all of these people unemployed due to jobs being sent overseas. they should bring them back for the same about money, and i can almost guarantee you -- i am an accountant -- they could manufacture those jobs here in the united states, give people a living wage, give them pensions and fringe benefits and put people back to work. just like the person they call before, who has the skills in textiles, items like that. put them back to work by starting to open up those close the factories, and using american workers.
for college. and a dangerous trend for chewy gummy bears. how kids are using them to get drunk. "the nfl wouldn't be what it is today, if it weren't for al davis." plus - the oakland raiders take the field today without their fearless leader. raider nation mourns the death of al davis. it's 8:00 a-m on this sunday, october 9-th. good morning, i'm anne makovec. i'm phil matier. there s a lot to talk about in our next half-hour... (chat about it's 8:00 on sunday morning. thanks for starting your day with us. >> we've got a half hour, and it's filled with news. one of the topics, federal crack down on pot clubs around california. and we have the opening of voting on the mayor's race in san francisco. >> lots going on. going to be a big week. first a moment of silence today for the man who changed professional football. houston raiders players will be wearing black armbands to mark the passing of team owner al davis, who died yesterday, 82 years old. the cause of his death has not officially been released, but several friends said his health had really been failing recently. a tremendous los
those people who use the use act was only themselves in mind. >> the california compassionate use act was intended to help seriously ill people. but the law has been hijacked by profiteers who are motivated not by compassion, but money. >> steve is co-founder of oakland's harborside health center, one of the largest december pens riz. he says the rack down will hurt them none thes less, forcing them back on to streets. >> this is an attack on a mistake and a lie to characterize this as anything eels at the cow palace, they're shorting out -- sorting out how this will affect them. >> people who are quote, unquote boutique growers, the government isn't interested in them, they're not interested in people like myself growing their six plants in the backyard. >> i think everybody should remember this swings back and forth and i've been in the industry 30 years and back in 1976 we thought it was going to be legalized just around the corner. >> the northern district u.s. attorney says she'll focus on dispenseries near schools and parks and sent letters to land lords warning of possible
mayor brown for that opportunity, because i think 12 years ago there were not many of us on those revenue generating departments that could participate in some major policy decisions and contracts that run this city. i want you to please have that thank you extended to your dad. this morning, i sat in on the workshops and i was very encouraged. a lot of people like roma were there, people we have all work together at various points in our lives the last 20 years, but there were also a lot of new faces, young faces, and it is encouraging that our city has so many dedicated women were willing to spend the time, volunteer time for the most part, to make this city one of the greatest leaders for women's issues and rights and equality. i think we have proven that. i am very encouraged that perhaps in the next four, five years we will get ahead in terms of our own country stepping up to the plate. thank you again, and thank you, shelly. [applause] >> i want to also make sure i acknowledge another person on our committee, and that is nancy acknowledge someone else on the committee. she i
no in my part of the u.s. government. >> no one from the bureau of the national narcotics and law enforcement knew about fast and furious in your testimony today? >> i became aware of it at the same time. >> what about drug enforcement administration? >> congressmen, we are working with those committees that are investigating that matter at this time that would be the comment that i would meet. >> so your comment is that you were not going to comment on a direct question about whether or not you're agency knew about fast and furious? >> my comment would be that we are working with those subcommittees that are investigating fast and furious. >> this happens to be a member of congress interested and you are now under oath so you could answer the question for me. >> i find that to be of great interest, but your predecessor just spoke, mr. brown's field can go on record that he didn't know anything about it and you cannot. do you know anything of fast and furious? >> i knew when it became exposed to all of you and in terms of my office i can say that no one in my office knew. >> you p
in waterloo. they took us to the same church bring up and we sat each week in the same pew. my grandmother taught bible study there. but when we grew up, i know without a shadow of a doubt in our lutheran church that the gospel was preached from the pulpit. i have no doubt it was breached. but i have to confess to you that i did not understand it. we would go to sunday school in the morning and we have our bibles and i would take -- my bible with and it just did not make any sense to me. there was a vital part of the week. life went on. my father got a job in honeywell in minneapolis. about a year after we moved up to minnesota, my parents unfortunately got a divorce. there were the first in my family to have a divorce. it happens to millions of people, but it was the first in our family. it was shocking to people. we immediately almost overnight when to below poverty. my father had left my mother had been a full-time homemaker. it was myself and my three brothers. i want you to know god has a tremendous sense of humor. there is no place that is better preparation for politics than for a g
for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more, cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off every day. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the u.s. war on al qaeda claimed another high- profile kill today-- this time, in yemen. the target was an american imam who preached at mosques in the u.s. before taking up jihad overseas. ray suarez has the story. >> suarez: t
was seriously hurt. tonight doctors tell us that scott olsen is improving. jana katsuyama brought us his story last night. tonight she's learned about an emotional reunion he had with his parents. >> reporter: it was today when his parents flew into oakland and got to see their son for the first time. the doctor at highland hospital tells me that scott olson is conscious. he's in the icu and let me tell you that comes as a huge relief to all the people that have come out here to to light candles for him. today in a vigil, more than 1,000 people sat quietly with candles and posters with his photo. >> it's unfortunate to get this many people out here like this to support him. i'm glad they're out here for him. >> reporter: tonight was a moment of peace after tuesday's night of chaos after the 22- year-old suffered a fractured skull. the chief of surgery said he's come out of an induced coma. although olson does not remember tuesday night. >> when he came in, he was unconscious. now he's processing everything. >> reporter: and he recognized his parents. signs of a community hoping for his full
and the accident has changed their lives and his nephew's. >> he talked to us, about god he got to us, reading the bible, you know, by himself, he regrets a lot over what happened you know, all the spanish community ... >> reporter: now sentencing in this case is scheduled february of next year, and the felony murder charge, that he was found guilty of today carries alone a maximum of 40 years in prison. defense argued today they considered this an accident there was no malicious intent he never intended to kill anyone during the accident but given his two prior dui convictions and arguments today, the judge did of course side with prosecution, defense is telling us today, lawyers are saying they do plan to likely appeal this case. that is the latest here in prince william county back to you. >> thank you. >>> now to the lululemon murder trial for the first time since testimony began the issue of motive was argued in court. the state attorney allowed the judge in the case to allow testimony shows jay that murray may have confronted brittany norwood over stolen merchandise but defense objected.
their encampment. one told us they expect some of those at that rally to come here tonight to protest their camp. there was plenty of aker directed at police today. last night thaerksd this physical confrontation with them, and tore down their tents ask tarps. justin herman plaza is designated as a park and that for bids a permanent encampment after 10:00. so there are skrimishes with protest qlorz tried to block public works vans and trucks which picked up their possessions. five people were arrested and protestors tell us they're not going leave tonight. >> we have every intention of remaining here and possibly to committed individuals working together to see a just society. >> this is the dialogue to try to convince them to tear down tarps into get out of justin herman plaza this is a park, and crews prohibit permanent structures and prohibit visitors after 5:00. did he not tell us what officers would do tonight or if tarps aren't removed by sock. you heard they're determined to stay here and may get help from oakland. they're going to be here tonight that. is the latest from justin herman pl
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